Archive for May, 2012

CANADiAN ART TRiBUTE : DAPHNE ODJiG / “THE iNDiAN iN TRANSiTiON” PAiNTiNG

Published by cctadmin on May 31st, 2012

Internationally recognized and renowned artist DAPHNE ODJiG  was born on September 11, 1919 and raised on the Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve on Manitoulin Island (Lake Huron), Ontario Canada. As a child, art was a favourite subject and she developed the habit of sketching with her grandfather and father who were both artistic.

Odjig has a unique Native style blended with a modern graphic approach. Influenced by Northwest Coast art during her time in British Columbia and by the developing Anishnabe style, her paintings focus on the importance of womanhood and sense of family. Central to her work is the circle, which to the Ojibwa signifies completion and perfection and is symbolic of women.”

Odjig has received numerous awards and honours including the first, (and as of November 2009), the only First Nation woman artist to show at the National Gallery of Canada, the Order of Canada, the Order of British Columbia, seven honorary degrees, the National Aboriginal Achievement Award, the Governor General’s Laureate for Visual and Media Arts, and the Expression Award from the National Film Board of Canada.

Odjig currently lives and works in Penticton, British Columbia, Canada. For more information, visit DaphneOdjig.com.


VOGUE FLASHBACK: 1977 / VERA WANG / AMERiCA’S SWEETHEART CHRiSTY BRiNKLEY iN FASHiON SHOOT BY CHRiS VON WANGENHEiM

Published by cctadmin on May 30th, 2012


CC PRESS : 2B MAGAZiNE; Getting It Right : New Album and single by CC Trubiak / May 20th 2012

Published by cctadmin on May 20th, 2012

Music

Getting it Right: new album and single by CC Trubiak

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by Jordan Arseneault on May 20, 2012

When you go to C.C. Trubiak’s website, the first thing you see is a Joe Dallessandro/Peter Berlin-inspired photographer of the musician’s lower torso and crotch. The “Enter” icon wittily appears as your cursor hovers over the fly in his jeans. What you see when you enter – as 2B did when we visited his charming apartment in Ottawa’s Gliebe for a private concert in his living room – is an artist living a trunk-full of paradoxes: the sensitive diva, the exhibitionist introvert, and perhaps the most contradictory of all: the gay folk musician…

When I arrive at C.C. Trubiak’s charming home in Ottawa’s historic Gliebe neighbourhood, it’s the morning after a big show with collaborator Danniel Oickle at the Mercury Lounge. Dressed as satyrs in vintage fur pants with ornamental horns, the sprightly Trubiak had sung and read in Oickle’s song cycle Corruption of the Flesh. Readers may recall Oickle and Trubiak as coverboys for the Capital Pride special issue in a sexy series shot by Dan Ziemkiewicz. Over the past year, the two have evolved in tandem, each singing on the other’s albums – Oickle sings on the track “Blue” – and supporting their live shows. Though their styles may differ, their drive to create is their common ground. While Oickle seeks inspiration in Kate Bush et al, Trubiak workships at the altar of one great diva: Dolly Parton.

From Fags to Bitches

For the folkster and photographer, Dolly represents the contradiction “between something glittery and shiny to look at, but underneath there is so much more depth.” On this, he picks up a copy of Dolly’s autobiography, My Life and Other Unfinished Business, and reads a passage about her rags to riches story. “Materially lacking but more than rich in spirit,” is the mantra that Trubiak returns to when he’s mustering up the fire needed to make it as a queer musician. (We decide that our shared middle class semi-rural stories aren’t so much rags to riches as fags to bitches, possible title to a memoir, depending on who writes theirs first!). Icons like Dolly, mixed in with some Joni Mitchell and Peter Berlin, were the inspirations that helped the pensive songster overcome his emotionally difficult childhood in remote Flin Flon, Manitoba.

“The primary message that I learned from growing up in Flin Flon was ‘you’re different, you’re not welcome, you make us uncomfortable,’” Trubiak recalls. “What I learned from that was ‘don’t express yourself.’ That was where the birth of my art and writing started in high school, soaking in books and film, alone.” Trubiak describes growing up in the 80s in rural Manitoba as “living amongst the cultural detritus of the end of the Seventies,” which may be why so much of his music is imbued with a deliberate anachronism. Trubiak’s preoccupation with the analogue past is reminiscent of the nostalgia and eccentricity of certain other Prairie visual artists with tendencies toward the pre-digital. Is it about reclaiming the tough times?

“Back then, my influence musically was with folk and country: Joni Mitchell, Dylan, the confessional aspect of their music.” The otherwise mild-mannered empath says he sticks to folk because he loves the idea of being able to tell a story. “I’m in pain, are you in pain?” he asks in his plaintive but rich tenor. The pain of being a queer boy in an unforgiving rural place could have made Trubiak into a statistic: in high school, like so many who feel different, he struggled with feeling suicidal. “Prairie Boy” was written for the occasion of Victims’ Voices Matter, a conference he was invited to perform at by the GLBTTQ Community Centre and the Department of Justice. The pun on “fairy boy” is a part of healing his teenage self, much as his photographer side expunges any thoughts of shame around his sexuality. (Seriously, folks: check out his photos.)

The transition from loner to performer was a decade-long process, and one that paralleled Trubiak completing a social work degree, which may take him back to Flin Flon some day. The country influence on his music stays low-fi, including a Tammy Wynette cover – “Till I Get it Right” – that he sang to me live, finishing with the wet eyes of someone who lives the emotions of the song every single time. “One of the toughest things about performing live is that I feel like I could cry every time I sing,” he says as I wipe my own eyes.

Check out CC Trubiak’s “Lonely Blue Waves (I Want You)” on Youtube.

They Say I’m Different is available on iTunes or at www.cctrubiak.com

 


LONELY BLUE WAVES (i WANT YOU) : CC TRUBiAK / OFFiCiAL ViDEO RELEASE / TORRiD PRODUCTiONS

Published by cctadmin on May 20th, 2012

A TORRiD PRODUCTiON
Directed by DANNiEL OiCKLE (www.dannieloickle.com)
Cinematography by BONNiE FiNDLEY (www.findleyfoto.com)

The official music video for  “Lonely Blue Waves (I Want You)” from my debut album, “They Say I’m Different” (nominated for Xpress Album of the Year, 2011).

iTunes: http://bit.ly/KhTwTr
CD Baby: http://bit.ly/J5a2tt
ReverbNation: http://bit.ly/hq8Pnd

Special Thanks to Danniel and Bonnie – CC xx


YOU GOT SQUARED PHOTOGRAPHS CC TRUBiAK / MARCH 2012

Published by cctadmin on May 20th, 2012

Check out these images, taken by Ottawa photographer J PEREZ ALVAREZ, of YOU GOT SQUARED PHOTOGRAPHY.  For more info on YOU GOT SQUARED, check out www.yougotsquared.com.



FROM THE VAULTS : DAN ZiEMKiEWiCZ PHOTOGRAPHS CC TRUBiAK (circa 2010)

Published by cctadmin on May 19th, 2012

Here are a few photos, taken a few years ago now – by my friend and fellow photographer, DAN ZiEMKiEWiCZ.  These have never been released before and if you notice I didn’t even have my arm tattoos at that time!  ZiEMKiEWWiCZ is one of a kind and I encourage you to check out more of his work.

His contact info:

Email:  dan@danziemiewicz.com

Online: danziemkiewwicz.com

on twitter: @dawzyphoto


TORRiD TUESDAY / REHEARSAL w/ DAN & OLEX

Published by cctadmin on May 18th, 2012


Words of WiSDOM: “BE WHO YOU ARE AND DO iT ON PURPOSE” – DOLLY PARTON

Published by cctadmin on May 17th, 2012


CC MUSiC LOG/JOURNAL : LONELY BLUE WAVES (I WANT YOU) / LiVE iN THE STUDiO

Published by cctadmin on May 15th, 2012


FiONA APPLE & ‘EXTRAORDiNARY MACHiNE’ (2008)

Published by cctadmin on May 13th, 2012

I’ve been a huge fan of FiONA APPLE since her 1996 debut album TiDAL, which was a critical and commercial success.  The American singer/songwriter and pianist is no stranger to the highs and lows that come with fame – but her musical style, which contains elements of jazz and alternative rock has been praised and has given her a significant cult following.

TiDAL is by far my favorite album of hers as a whole but her less commercially successful albums WHEN THE PAWN… and EXTRAORDiNARY MACHiNE are also well worth listening to.  And many fans await her fourth studio project THE iDLER WHEEL…which is slated for a June release.   I know I’m looking forward to it – and in the meantime – weather you love her or hate her, check out EXTRAORDiNARY MACHiNE here!